• Pinebrook Hills Stair: This stair is composed of quarter-sawn oak and translucent resin panels for a light, almost ethereal simplicity.

  • The quality of light that now occupies what was a dark and uninviting entry is beautiful.

  • Modern Barn stair: This stair combines an agricultural industrial feel with minimal modernism. Open treads let in light from windows above.

  • Helical Stair: This award-winning stair design is completely novel, with no vertical supports between landings. The cylindrical stairwell has a large window and skylight above.

  • The stair treads are limestone, the stringers and balusters are waxed steel, and the handrail is smooth Bubinga wood (sustainably harvested, of course).

  • The effect as one looks up or down the stairwell is a spiral continuity.

  • Craftsmanlike Stair: The horizontal balusters interweave with the vertical to create a repeating square. Here they extend the horizontal lines of the treads and plaster reveals.

  • Mountain Ranch Stair: a sleek steel guardrail provides a contrast to the heavy timber superstructure.

  • Italianate Stair: The pattern is based on the repeating Gothic pointed arch, but with an ellipse instead. It allows the shapes to slide next to each other to accommodate four different slopes.

  • Italianate Stair: A closeup shows the repeating ellipse pattern with a ring inserted (cut from a steel pipe). We provided full scale drawings for the fabrication of these pieces.

 Before
Back Forth

Before

Stairs

This section provides a sampling of interior stairs and railings, which are often center-pieces of the home.

The Pinebrook Hills Stair is composed of quarter-sawn oak and translucent resin panels for a light, almost ethereal simplicity.

The Helical Stair has no vertical supports between the landings is a completely novel concept. The effect as one looks up or down the stairwell is a spiral continuity.

In the Craftsmanlike Stair, the horizontal balusters extend the horizontal lines of the treads and plaster reveals and combine with the vertical balusters to create a repeating square, a modern interpretation of a Craftsman motif.

The Italianate Stair baluster pattern is based on the repeating Gothic pointed arch, but the shape is an ellipse, rather than an arc. It allows the shapes to slide next to each other to accommodate the same continuous geometry for each of the four different slopes.

  • Date April 8, 2017
  • Tags Homes